Category: Uncategorized

Resource recommendations – Books

On Sex Surrogacy

Feder T, D TF. Sex Is the Least of It, Surrogate Partners Discuss Love Life and Intimacy. 2014. (Amazon)

Ben‐Zion, I., Rothschild, S., Chudakov, B., & Aloni, R. (2007). Surrogate versus couple therapy in vaginismus. The journal of sexual medicine, 4(3), 728-733. (Wiley)

Noonan, R. J. (1984). Sex Surrogates: A Clarification of Their Functions (Master’s thesis). SexQuest/The Sex Institute. (Sexquest.com)

Fox, A. and Szego, J. (2003). Sex and the Surrogate. The Age Magazine. (TheAge.com.au)

Yingling, K. (2014). Sexual Surrogate Partner? Dirty and Thirty.com. (www.dirtyandthirty.com)

Sohn, A. (2011). Healing Hands. New York Magazine. (www.nymag.com)

More women turning to sex surrogates for help. (2011). CBS News. (www.cbsnews.com)

Dodes, R. (2012). Confessions of a Sex Surrogate. The Wall Street Journal. (blogs.wsj.com)

Guthmann, E. (2012). Male surrogate’s passion for intimacy. San Francisco Gate. (www.sfgate.com)

Muller, R. T. (2013). Sexual Surrogates Help many Who Suffer Alone. Psychology Today. (www.psychologytoday.com)

Kerner, I. (2012). Surrogates can be sexual healers. Chart – CNN. (www.cnn.com)

On Male Sexuality

Bernie Zilbergeld. (1999). The new male sexuality. Bantam. (www.amazon.com)

Kaplan, H. S. (2013). How to overcome premature ejaculation. Routledge.(www.amazon.com)

Metz, M. E., & McCarthy, B. W. (2004). Coping with erectile dysfunction: How to regain confidence and enjoy great sex. New Harbinger. (www.amazon.com)

Castleman, M. (2008). Great sex: A man’s guide to the secret principles of total-body sex. Rodale.(www.amazon.com)

Paley, M., & Ruzzier, S. (2000). The book of the penis. Grove Press. (www.amazon.com)

On Female Sexuality

Heiman, J., & LoPiccolo, J. (1988). Becoming orgasmic: A sexual and personal growth program for women. New York: Prentice Hall. (www.amazon.com)

Barbach, L. (1976). For yourself: The fulfillment of female sexuality. Signet. (www.amazon.com)

Goodwin, A. J. (1997). A Woman’s Guide to Overcoming Sexual Fear & Pain. New Harbinger Publications Incorporated. (www.amazon.com)

Foley, S., Kope, S. A., & Sugrue, D. P. (2011). Sex matters for women: A complete guide to taking care of your sexual self. Guilford Press. (www.amazon.com)

Northrup, C. (2012). The Wisdom of Menopause (revised edition). Hay House, Inc. (www.amazon.com)

Valins, L. (1992). When a woman’s body says no to sex: Understanding and overcoming vaginismus. Penguin Group USA. (www.amazon.com)

On Sexuality and Disability

Sexuality and Disability – The Web Site. (www.sexualityanddisability.org)

Vicary, F. (2014). Sex and disability: yes, the two can and should go together. The Guardian. (www.theguardian.com)

Disability Sexuality: Information on Sex & Disabled Sexual Issues. (2016). Disabled World. (www.disabled-world.com)

Tepper, M. (2016. Videos on Sexuality and the Disabled. Vimeo. (www.vimeo.com)

 

IMBT holds “Be expanded in the Triadic Model” in Philadelphia, PA

  • Are you a mental health provider, bodyworker, or somatic practitioner interested in surrogate partner therapy?
  • Are you seeking to specialize in human sexuality?
  • Would you benefit from growing your practice and increasing referrals?

8c06a198-ca43-48df-9772-a42c698c3defThe Institute held a  three-day workshop in Philadelphia, PA to teach clinicians, body practitioners, and others more about how to work with other professionals that are supporting clients in mind body interventions. The workshop helps participants learn more about how to work within an expanded model that supports multiple integrative mind/body modalities.

Dr. Susan Kaye, sexuality educator, therapist, and intimacy coach, and Andrés Cordero, Ph.D. student in human sexuality, sexuality educator, and embodiment coach,facilitated conversations with guests who shared their insights about how to work with many clients, including those that are shy or socially challenged; grieving from a life circumstance; lacking sexual self-confidence; survivors of abuse, assault, or trauma; lacking a positive body image; struggling with emotional disconnect and physical disfunction; and others.

Guest speakers included:

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William Stayton, Ph.D.

Professor, Clinical Psychologist, Marriage and Family Therapist

 

 

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Carol Cobb-Nettleton, Ph.D.

Founder, Wayne Counseling Center, Therapist, and Specialist in  Sexuality, Disability, and Gender Dysphoria

 

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Mitchell Tepper, Ph.D.

Internationally-recognized Sexologist, Disability Expert, and pioneer in the application of Telemedicine to sexual health

 

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Michele Angello, Ph.D.

Author, Clinical Psychologist and Gender Specialist

 

 

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Reverend Beverly Dale

Writer, Performer, Ordained Minister and Specialist in Christian-based Sexual Wounding

 

This 3-day workshop was part of the Experiential Learning Series offered by the Institute for Mind Body Therapy. It is the first step in applying for surrogate partner certification through the Institute for Mind Body Therapy.

Watch Video > : “A team of three – Supporting your clients by working with other professionals”

Originally broadcast on Thursday, July 21, 2016

One of the most important distinctions your clients can make is this difference. For one, the need for touch is a different need than the need for sexual expression, and once you can take them apart, they can meet each of those needs more authentically. On this call, we’ll talk about that difference, what the needs actually are and how to help your client (and maybe yourself) be able to tell the difference and actually meet the needs.

For most people, this means being able to experience touch that is not about sex – and doesn’t feel like sex – which for many people is even more frightening than sex. It opens a different door in the heart, and often a more vulnerable one.

Watch Video > : “Marcella Lyles – The Skin Hunger Project”

Originally broadcast on February 18, 2016

The mission of “The Skin Hunger Project” is to bring awareness, acceptance and advocacy to the issue of Skin Hunger. This conversation will be an exploration in the groundbreaking work we hope the Project will accomplish. Our goal is to support and promote the collaboration of Participants and Practitioners, Educators, Scientists and Social Media outlets in their efforts to powerfully address Skin Hunger.

Skin Hunger: (n) The experience and expression of negative emotions and behaviors that result from a lack of touch.

Much like the body needs water and food to survive, the need for touch is very real and important. It is said that in order to survive, human beings need at least 4 hugs/acts of touch a day. For optimal care, it is suggested that those hugs/acts of touch should last no less than 5 minutes to allow for the creation of Oxytocin, which causes a sense of relaxation, connection and healing. While 4 hugs/acts of touch are needed for survival, 8 hugs/acts per day are required for optimal maintenance and 12 daily hugs/acts are needed for the person to grow and thrive. This means, that even if people are getting some touch they may not be getting enough touch to prevent the negative impacts of Skin Hunger.

Watch Video > : “Betty Martin – Deconflating Touch and Sex”

Originally broadcast on Thursday, January 21, 2016

One of the most important distinctions your clients can make is this difference. For one, the need for touch is a different need than the need for sexual expression, and once you can take them apart, they can meet each of those needs more authentically. On this call, we’ll talk about that difference, what the needs actually are and how to help your client (and maybe yourself) be able to tell the difference and actually meet the needs.

For most people, this means being able to experience touch that is not about sex – and doesn’t feel like sex – which for many people is even more frightening than sex. It opens a different door in the heart, and often a more vulnerable one.

Watch Video > : “Nina Hartley – Entertainer, Activist, Educator, and RN”

Originally broadcast on Thursday, November 19, 2015

Nina Hartley is a pioneering feminist sex worker, using her body in the service of promoting a sexually sane and literate society. She is thrilled to see a new generation of sex-positive performer/activists take its space and spread the good news about sex. Active as a performer since 1982, her rock-solid commitment to the importance of sexual autonomy has fueled Ms. Hartley’s career in adult entertainment.

As a performer, director, writer, educator, public speaker, and feminist thinker for all, no matter their orientation, she’s traveled the world to deliver her message. She believes that sexual freedom is a fundamental human right and welcomes the new social media opportunities for spreading her message of knowledge and empowerment to the widest number of people. She’s the author of, “Nina Hartley’s Guide to Total Sex,” from Avery Press. Putting to use her B.S. degree in nursing, she and her husband, Ernest Greene, have produced the million-selling sex-ed video series collectively known as “The Nina Hartley Guides,” from Adam & Eve, currently in its 38th episode.

Ms. Hartley serves on the board of directors for the Woodhull Sexual Freedom Alliance (www.woodhullalliance.org). Still active in front of the camera, she and her husband live in Los Angeles.

Join us for an enlightening teleconference hosted by Dr. Susan Kaye, as we learn more about Nina’s work in advocating for sexual freedom as a fundamental human right.